There are 28 titles associated with this firm.

@book{ wphp_25178
  author={Defoe,Daniel},
  year={1723},
  title={The history and remarkable life of the truly honourable Col. Jacque, commonly call'd Col. Jack, who was born a gentleman, put 'prentice to a pick-pocket, was six and twenty years a thief, and then kidnapp'd to Virginia. Came back a merchant, married four wives, and five of them prov'd whores; went into the wars, behav'd bravely, got preferment, was made colonel of a regiment, came over, and fled with the Chevalier, and is now abroad compleating a life of wonders, and resolves to dye a general.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25239
  author={Defoe,Daniel},
  year={1723},
  title={The history and remarkable life of the truly honourable Col. Jacque, commonly call'd Col. Jack, who was born a gentleman, put 'prentice to a pick-pocket, was six and twenty years a thief, and then kidnapp'd to Virginia. Came back a Merchant; was Five times married to Four Whores; went into the Wars, behav'd bravely, got Preferment, was made Colonel of a Regiment, came over, and fled with the Chevalier, is still abroad compleating a Life of Wonders, and resolves to dye a General. The Second Edition.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25239
  author={Defoe,Daniel},
  year={1723},
  title={The history and remarkable life of the truly honourable Col. Jacque, commonly call'd Col. Jack, who was born a gentleman, put 'prentice to a pick-pocket, was six and twenty years a thief, and then kidnapp'd to Virginia. Came back a Merchant; was Five times married to Four Whores; went into the Wars, behav'd bravely, got Preferment, was made Colonel of a Regiment, came over, and fled with the Chevalier, is still abroad compleating a Life of Wonders, and resolves to dye a General. The Second Edition.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25219
  author={de Gondi,Jean François Paul},
  year={1723},
  title={Memoirs of the Cardinal de Retz, containing all the great events during the minority of Louis XIV, and administration of Cardinal Mazarin. Done out of French.},
  publisher={John Brotherton \& John Stagg \& Charles King \& Thomas Payne [Paine] \& Anne Dodd I},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25913
  author={Dubourdieu,Jean-Armand},
  year={1724},
  title={Méphiboseth: ou le caractère d'un bon sujet. Sermon sur le II. Livre de Sam. Ch. XIX. v. 30. Prononcé le 5me Janvier 1723/4 sur le retour du Roy de la Grande Brétagne dans son roı̈aume @ dans son Palais. Dédié au Duc de ***. Par J. Armand Dubourdieu, Ministre de la Savoy.},
  publisher={A. Rocairol \& John Stagg \& Anne Dodd I \& Veuve la Tour [Widow Tower]},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25365
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1725},
  title={Female piety and virtue. A poem.},
  publisher={James Roberts [Warwick Lane] \& John Billingsley \& Anne Dodd I \& John Stagg \& Henry Whitridge [Lincoln's Inn]},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25670
  author={Parliament of Great Britain,House of Commons and Parliament of Great Britain,House of Lords},
  year={1728},
  title={An exact list of the Lords spiritual and temporal; shewing by distinct symbols, I. The knights of the garter. II. Of the thistle. III. Of the Bath. IV. Privy-Counsellours. V. The Scotch Peers. VI. The Peers under Age. Vii. Others who are not qualify'd to sit in the House. Viii. The Lords and Ladies who walk'd in the Procession to their Majesties Coronation, and the Order each Rank walked in, by Figures. Also, a true compleat double list of the knights and commissioners of shires, citizens and burgesses, returned to serve in the Parliament summoned to meet Nov. 28. 1727. and from thence prorogued to Jan. 23. 1727-8. being the first Parliament of K. George II. and the Seventh of Great Britain (since the Union) digested in such a Method, that if either the Person or Place be known, the rest may be immediately found. viz. I. The Counties, Cities and Boroughs in Alphabetical Order, with the Names of their Representatives against the same respectively. II. The Names of the Members, with their respective City, County, or Borough, against the same, distinguishing the new Members, and specifying how many Parliaments the old have served in. Contrived either to Stitch or Frame. To which is added, the names of such gentlemen of the last Parliament who are left out of the present. The second edition, with alterations.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25478
  author={Defoe,Daniel},
  year={1728},
  title={Augusta triumphans: or, the way to make London the most flourishing city in the universe. First, by establishing an university where Gentlemen may have Academical Education under the Eye of their Friends. II. To prevent much Murder, &c. by an Hospital for Foundlings. III. By suppressing pretended Mad-Houses, where many of the fair Sex are unjustly confin'd, while their Husbands keep Mistresses, &c. and many Widows are lock'd up for the Sake of their Jointure. IV. To save our Youth from Destruction, by clearing the Streets of impudent Strumpets, Suppressing Gaming-Tables, and Sunday Debauches. V. To avoid the expensive Importation of Foreign Musicians, by forming an Academy of our own. VI. To save our lower Class of People from utter Ruin, and render them useful, by preventing the immoderate Use of Geneva: With a frank Explosion of many other common Abuses, and incontestable Rules for Amendment. Concluding with an effectual method to prevent street robberies; and a letter to Coll. Robinson, on account of the orphan's tax.},
  publisher={James Roberts [Warwick Lane] \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25723
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1728},
  title={Liberty: or, the meeting of the Parliament. A poem.},
  publisher={Thomas Warner \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25589
  author={Defoe,Daniel},
  year={1729},
  title={Augusta triumphans: or, the way to make London the most flourishing city in the universe. First, by establishing an university where Gentlemen may have Academical Education under the Eye of their Friends. II. By an Hospital for Foundlings. III. By forming an Academy of Sciences at Christ's-Hospital. IV. By suppressing pretended Mad-Houses, where many of the fair Sex are unjustly confin'd, while their Husbands keep Mistresses, &c. and many Widows are lock'd up for the Sake of their Jointure. V. To save our Youth from Destruction, by clearing the Streets of impudent Strumpets. Suppressing Gaming - Tables, and Sunday Debauches. VI. To save our lower Class of People from utter Ruin, and render them useful by preventing the immoderate Use of Geneva: With a frank Explosion of many other common Abuses, and incontestable Rules for Amendment. Concluding with an effectual method to prevent street robberies; and a letter to Coll. Robinson, on account of the orphan's tax. By Andrew Moreton, Esq;  The Second Edition.},
  publisher={James Roberts [Warwick Lane] \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25647
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1729},
  title={An enquiry into the causes of the present epidemical diseases, viz. Fevers, Coughs, Asthma's, Rheumatisms, Defluxions, &c. With Proper methods for the Speedy cure of them. By the author of The Family Companion for Health.},
  publisher={Francis Fayram \& John Stagg \& Anne Dodd I \& James Leake I},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25825
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1732},
  title={A hymn to the chair: or, lucubrations, serious and comical, on the use of chairs, Benches, Forms, Joint-Stools, Three-Legged Stools, and Ducking-Stools. The Hint taken from the Craftsman of the 6th Instant, and improv'd for the Benefit of those who sit on Chairs of Ease, and those who sit upon Thorns and Nettles. - In a particular manner is handled with all due Reverence and Respect, The Chair of St-e. The Chair of the House of Commons. The L-d Ma-'s Chair. The tottering Charitable Corporation Chair. The Bench of Justices Chair. The East-India Chair. The South-Sea Chair. The Greenland Chair. The Mechanick Chairs. The Sedan Chair. The Easy Chair. The Maundering Chair. The Fornicating Chair. The Cambridge Chair. Several Imaginary Chairs. The Couch Chair. The Duke of Venus' Chair. Corporation Chairs. Trading Justices Chair. Dr. Busby's Chair. To which are added The Beauties and Advantages of other necessary Utensils to rest the Bum upon, and ease the Mind, the Body, and the Breeches.},
  publisher={Bispham Dickinson \& Thomas Corbett \& Richard Montague \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25939
  author={Unknown,[Man]},
  year={1732},
  title={The delightful adventures of Honest John Cole, that merry old soul. Who from his antipathy to every thing that is white, became president of the Japanner's Company, and afterwards Chairman to the Chimney-Sweepers Society; and at length instituted Patron of the merry Blacks of Waltham. His Intrigues with several Black-ey'd Girls at Black-Mary's hole, and Marriage to a Blackmore at Black-wall, and becoming a Blackwell-Hall Factor. With several Cole-Black-Jokes, Brown-Jokes, and Jokes as sweet as Honey. Together with diverting Songs, his Death and Burial, which was on Black-Heath, under a Black-Thorn; and his Epitaph, wrote by a Colamantee Negro from Antegoa, nam'd Diego in the Creolian Stile and Language ... By a tipling philosopher of the Royal Society.},
  publisher={Richard Montague \& Bispham Dickinson \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25943
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1732},
  title={The harlot's progress: or, the humours of Drury-Lane. Being the life of the noted Moll Hackabout, in six hudibrastick cantos, with a curious print to each canto, engrav'd from the originals of Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to Town in the York Waggon; and being betray'd by an old Baud into the Arms of Colonel Ch-s; with several Comical Dialogues, &c. II. Her being kept by a Jew; with her Intrigues in his House. III. Her living in a Baudy-House in Drury-Lane. A diverting List of the Decorations of her Lodging. Her being detected by Sir Jn G---n, &c. IV. Her Usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; and the Humours of the Place. V. Her Sickness and Death. Disputes between two noted Quacks. Her last Will. VI. Her Burial. Characters of the principal Persons who constituted the Funeral Pomp, &c. The Fifth Edition. To which is now first added, a curious Riddle, which Moll learned of the Jew, while in his keeping, and which the learned Col. Ch-s could never answer to her full Satisfaction.},
  publisher={Richard Montague \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25416
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1732},
  title={The harlot's progress: or, the humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth . I. Her coming to Town in the York Waggon; her being betray'd by an old Baud into the Arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early Improvement in the Sweets of Fornication; and some Dialogues, Serious and Comical, between a Country Girl in the Waggon, and a Parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry Intrigues in the Jew's House; with Satyric̀al Pictures in the Jew's Chamber. III. Her living in a Baudy-House in Drury-Lane; her Extravagance, Company, Baudy-House Equipage, Pictures, and other Drury Decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her Usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; with some merry Adventures of Fops, Pimps, Whores, Bauds, and Panders, who were committed to keep her Company. V. Her Sickness and Death; Disputes between two noted Quacks, Temple-Bar and Bow-Bell Doctors, on the Nature of her Distemper; and her last Will and Testament. VI. Her Burial; the Funeral Pomp of Harlots in Triumph; Six Mutes, Sisters of the Trade; the Parson, a very Wag; the Clerk, a Sly-Boots; and the Undertaker, one of the Family of the Sad Dogs. The Third Edition.},
  publisher={Bispham Dickinson \& Richard Montague \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25552
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1732},
  title={The harlot's progress: or, The humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in Hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to town in the York waggon; her being betray'd by an old baud into the arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early improvement in the sweets of fornication; and some dialogues, serious and comical, between a country girl in the waggon, and a parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry intrigues in the Jew's house; with satyrical pictures in the Jew's chamber. III. Her living in a baudy-house in Drury-Lane; her extravagance, company, baudy house equipage, pictures, and other Drury decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; ... V. Her sickness and death; ... VI. Her burial; the funeral pomp of harlots in triumph; six mutes, sisters of the trade; the parson, a very wag; the clerk, a sly-boots; and the undertaker, one of the family of the sad dogs.},
  publisher={Bispham Dickinson \& Richard Montague \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_24981
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1732},
  title={The Harlot's Progress: or, the Humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to Town in the York Waggon; her being betray'd by an old Baud into the Arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early Improvement in the Sweets of Fornication; and some Dialogues, Serious and Comical, between a Country Girl in the Waggon, and a Parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry Intrigues in the Jew's House; with Satyrical Pictures in the Jew's Chamber. III. Her living in a Baudy-House in Drury-Lane; her Extravagance, Company, Baudy-House Equipage, Pictures, and other Drury Decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her Usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; with some merry Adventures of Fops, Pimps, Whores, Bauds, and Panders, who were committed to keep her Company. V. Her Sickness and Death; Disputes between two noted Quacks, Temple-Bar and Bow-Bell Doctors, on the Nature of her Distemper; and her last Will and Testament. VI. Her Burial; the Funeral Pomp of Harlots in Triumph; Six Mutes, Sisters of the Trade; the Parson, a very Wag; the Clerk, a Sly-Boots; and the Undertaker, one of the Family of the Sad Dogs. The Second Edition.},
  publisher={Bispham Dickinson \& Richard Montague \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25147
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1732},
  title={The progress of a rake: or, the Templar's exit. In ten cantos, in hudibrastick verse. Containing I. His coming out of the West of England, being put under the Care of his Uncle, a Middlesex Justice. II. His Learning at Westminster-School; and his creeping to Bed with the Maid, for fear of the Spirits. III. His going to Brasen-Nose College at Oxford; being expell'd for his Debaucheries; and Return into the Country; with his Whoring, Roaring, Ranting, Swearing, Fighting, &c. IV. His coming again to London; falling among Pettifoggers, and Solicitors; and the Disputes among his Friends, whether he should be a Priest, a Lawyer, or a Physician. V. His following all three successively; and his vast Improvement in each Faculty, especially that of a Cushion-Thumper. VI. His Natural Philosophy; other natural Parts, and natural Impudence. Vii. His Conversation with old Bauds, young Whores, and Town Sharpers. Viii. His ruining his Reputation, Estate, and Constitution. IX. His Pains, and Repentance; Sickness without Pity; and Misery without Mercy. X. His Death by a Halter; Burial by a Dunghil; and Funeral-Sermon by a converted Rake of Covent-Garden. The whole interspers'd with innocent Mirth, good Morals, and too much of the Author's own Experience. By the author of The harlot's progress.},
  publisher={Bispham Dickinson \& Richard Montague \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25529
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1734},
  title={A defence of the essay for a review of the Book of Common Prayer, so far as relates to the Athanasian creed. In answer to a letter in the Weekly Miscellany of Octob. 19th last. Wherein Every Argument made use of by the Letter-Writer, is fairly Considered, and clearly Refuted. And that the Nicene Creed is sufficient to secure the Christian Faith from all Heresies, especially the Arian, is fully demonstrated from Athanasius himself. By the author of the essay.},
  publisher={Thomas Cooper \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25369
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1734},
  title={An essay for a review of the Book of common prayer. To which is added, a specimen thereof. Submitted to the Consideration of those in Authority. Attempted by an impartial hand.},
  publisher={Thomas Cooper \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25980
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1734},
  title={The Historical Register, containing an impartial relation of all transactions, ... With a chronological diary ... Number LXXIII. Being the first for the year 1734. To be continu'd every quarter.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_24969
  author={Peck,Frances},
  year={1735},
  title={A Complete Catalogue of all the Discourses Written, Both for and against Popery, in the Time of King James II. Containing in the Whole, An Account of Four Hundred and Fifty seven Books and Pamphlets, a great Number of them not mentioned in the three former Catalogues. With References after each Title, for the more speedy finding of a further Account of the said Discourses, and of their Authors, in sundry Writers: and an Alphabetical List of the Writers on each Side. A tract very necessary for these Times, and for all those who are desirous to complete their Sets of those Pieces, or would sort them to the best Advantage. Drawn up in a new Method, by Francis Peck, M.A. rector of Godeby, near Melton in Leicestershire.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25800
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1735},
  title={The remembrancer: being a daily chronicle and yearly journal of the remarkable occurrences in Great Britain, and even throughout Europe, from William the Conqueror to the present year 1735. Including not only the Births, Marriages, Coronations, and Deaths of the Sovereign Princes; But the most considerable Battles and Sieges during the late Wars; with the several Alliances and other Treaties betwixt this and foreign Nations; And all the Grand Conspiracies, Rebellions, Massacres, Executions, Plagues, Fires, &c. that have happen'd during the seven last Centuries.},
  publisher={Joseph Fisher \& Anne Dodd I \& John Stagg \& John Jolliffe},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25148
  author={Higgons,Bevill},
  year={1736},
  title={A poem on nature: in imitation of Lucretius. To which is added, A description of the fotus in the womb, in a letter to the late Duke of Buckinghamshire, on his Dutchess being declar'd Pregnant. By the late Bevill Higgons, Esq;},
  publisher={Patrick Meighan \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25946
  author={Sabourn,Reay},
  year={1737},
  title={The scotch prophecy: or, the Lord Belhaven's remarkable speech before the union, examin'd and compar'd with the articles afterwards concluded, and now subsisting Wherein The Advantages accruing to Scotland by the Union, are discovered. By Reay Sabourn.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25387
  author={Cowley,John},
  year={1742},
  title={The candidates guide; or, the electors rights decided. Shewing the determination of the rights of elections, by the Honble the Commons of Great Britain ... in all contraverted elections ... The third edition, corrected and improved with great additions. To which is added the like determinations in contraverted elections for North Britain, since the union. ... Together with the heads of the statutes now in force ... By J. C. Gent.},
  publisher={John Brindley \& },
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25655
  author={Thomas,John},
  year={1745},
  title={A sermon preached before the House of Lords, in the Abbey-Church of Westminster, on Wednesday, January 30th, 1744. Being the Day appointed to be observed as the Day of the Martyrdom of King Charles I. By John Lord Bishop of Lincoln. The Second Edition.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }
@book{ wphp_25424
  author={Henley,John},
  year={1748},
  title={The informer's winding-sheet: or, Nine oaths for a shilling. Being a parable, in five allegorical discourses: on I. St. Paul's treatment and apology, on a charge of preaching against the government. II. Gallio's prohibiting the prosecution of St. Paul, for words; and a sketch of words accused, in a manuscript paper, privately handed about the public, answered. III. The liberty of one Protestant dissenter's preaching in his own way, asserted; proving the words were for the government: and a reply to the censure of indecent or light expressions, pretense of religion, ridiculing religion, wicked purpose, sedition, treason, blasphemy, disorder, &c. IV. The justice's and counsellor's Vade-Mecum, a disquisition on false witness, by the laws of God, nature, nations, philosophy, the civil, canon, and common laws; and the validity or nullity of evidence of words decided. V. The right to free speaking and reasoning in all lights, on trustees of government, no sedition, but one weight in the people's choice on occasion between in English free Protestant authority, and a supposed French popish dominion: and sedition defin'd. By Sir Mawdcope Moreclarke, of Hull, in Coates's rents, Garrn-Street, opposite the sign of the seven affidavits.},
  publisher={Lilburn Shaftsbury \& },
  address={London},    }