ID 12098
Last Name Cruden
First Name Alexander
Title
Gender Male
Date of Birth 1699
Date of Death 1770
Place of Birth
Place of Death
VIAF URI http://viaf.org/viaf/17237181
Wikipedia Entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Cruden
Image URL
Notes
Timeline

Titles

Displaying 1–5 of 5

Role Title Date
Author The london-Citizen exceedingly injured: or a British inquisition display'd, in an account of the unparallel'd case of a citizen of London, bookseller to the late Queen, who was in a most unjust and arbitrary Manner sent on the 23d of March 1737/8, by one Robert Wightman of Edinburgh, a mere Stranger, to a private madhouse. Containing, I. An Account of the said Citizen's barbarous Treatment in Wright's Private Madhouse on Bethnal-Green for nine Weeks and six Days, and of his rational and patient Behaviour, whilst Chained, Handcuffed, Strait-Wastecoated and Imprisoned in the said Madhouse: Where he probably would have been continued, or died under his Confinement, if he had not most Providentially made his Escape: In which he was taken up by the Constable and Watchmen, being suspected to be a Felon, but was unchain'd and set at liberty by Sir John Barnard the then Lord Mayor. II. As also an Account of the illegal Steps, false Calumnies, wicked Contrivances, bold and desperate Designs of the said Wightman, in order to escape Justice for his Crimes, with some Account of his engaging Dr. Monro the Chairman, and Dr. Guyse, Mr. Crooksbank, J. Oswald, J. Coake, and R. Horton to be Judges of his Blind-Bench, and others as his Accomplices. The whole humbly addressed to the legislature, as plainly shewing the absolute Necessity of regulating Private Madhouses in a more effectual manner than at present. 1739
Author The london-Citizen exceedingly injured: or a British inquisition display'd, in an account of the unparallel'd case of a citizen of London, bookseller to the late Queen, who was in a most unjust and arbitrary Manner sent on the 23d of March last, 1738, by one Robert Wightman, a mere Stranger, to a private madhouse Containing, I. An Account of the said Citizen's barbarous Treatment in Wright's Private Madhouse on Bethnal-Green for nine Weeks and six Days, and of his rational and patient Behaviour, whilst Chained, Handcuffed, Strait-Wastecoated and Imprisoned in the said Madhouse: Where he probably would have been continued, or died under his Confinement, if he had not most Providentially made his Escape: In which he was taken up by the Constable and Watchmen, being suspected to be a Felon, but was unchain'd and set at liberty by Sir John Barnard the then Lord Mayor. II. As also an Account of the illegal Steps, false Calumnies, wicked Contrivances, bold and desperate Designs of the said Wightman, in order to escape Justice for his Crimes, with some Account of his engaging Dr. Monro and others as his Accomplices. The Whole humbly addressed to the Legislature, as plainly shewing the absolute Necessity of regulating Private Madhouses in a more effectual manner than at present. 1739
Author Alexander the corrector's humble address and earnest application to our most gracious King, the Right Honourable the House of Lords, and the Honourable House of Commons; shewing the necessity of appointing a corrector of the people, or taking some effectual measures for a speedy and a thorow Reformation; and that this important affair requires the serious and immediate consideration and vigorous and effectual resolution of his Majesty and both Houses of Parliament. With some account of Alexander the corrector the Author of the much esteemed Concordance of the Bible; and an Account of the Prophesies of some pious Ministers of the Gospel, foretelling that Alexander's Afflictions are designed by Divine Providence to be an Introduction and Preparation to his being a Joseph and an useful prosperous Man. 1755
Author The adventures of Alexander the corrector. The third part. Giving an account of his wonderful escape from an academy at Bethnal-Green by cutting with a knife the bedstead to which he was chained: and of the dissolution of the pretended Court of the Blind-Bench in the Poultry, and their designs against the corrector. And an account of his application at St. James's palace for the honour of knight-hood, and his conduct at Guildhall as a candidate for one of the representatives in Parliament of this great metropolis. With an account of his law-adventures while he acted the part of a counsellor in the King's-Bench in Westminster-hall. To which is added a history of his love-adventures, with his letters and a declaration of war sent to the amiable Mrs. Whitaker, a lady of a shining character and of great revenues. Interspersed with various religious reflexions, shewing the necessity of appointing a corrector of the people, or of taking some effectual measures for a speedy and thorow reformation. 1755
Author The corrector's earnest address to the inhabitants of Great-Britain. Shewing that the late earthquakes, and our being at war with a powerful nation, are loud calls from divine providence for a speedy and a thorow reformation, and for favouring the corrector's honest designs for that purpose. With an account of his earnest application to Parliament for an act to enable him to carry his good designs into execution. As also, an account of his visiting, as corrector of the people, last summer, the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, Eton-College, Windsor, and Tunbridge, and lately Westminster-School. Interspersed with many religious admonitions and reflexions, shewing the necessity and importance of appointing a corrector of the people, or of taking some effectual measures for a speedy and a thorow reformation. 1756

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"Cruden, Alexander" The Women's Print History Project, 2019, Person ID 12098, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/person/12098. Accessed 2024-04-25.

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