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Cruden, Alexander. The corrector's earnest address to the inhabitants of Great-Britain. Shewing that the late earthquakes, and our being at war with a powerful nation, are loud calls from divine providence for a speedy and a thorow reformation, and for favouring the corrector's honest designs for that purpose. With an account of his earnest application to Parliament for an act to enable him to carry his good designs into execution. As also, an account of his visiting, as corrector of the people, last summer, the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, Eton-College, Windsor, and Tunbridge, and lately Westminster-School. Interspersed with many religious admonitions and reflexions, shewing the necessity and importance of appointing a corrector of the people, or of taking some effectual measures for a speedy and a thorow reformation.The Women's Print History Project, 2019, title ID 25004, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/title/25004. Accessed 2024-04-12.

@book{ wphp_25004
  author={Cruden,Alexander},
  year={1756},
  title={The corrector's earnest address to the inhabitants of Great-Britain. Shewing that the late earthquakes, and our being at war with a powerful nation, are loud calls from divine providence for a speedy and a thorow reformation, and for favouring the corrector's honest designs for that purpose. With an account of his earnest application to Parliament for an act to enable him to carry his good designs into execution. As also, an account of his visiting, as corrector of the people, last summer, the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, Eton-College, Windsor, and Tunbridge, and lately Westminster-School. Interspersed with many religious admonitions and reflexions, shewing the necessity and importance of appointing a corrector of the people, or of taking some effectual measures for a speedy and a thorow reformation.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }

Suggestions and Comments for The corrector's earnest address to the inhabitants of Great-Britain. Shewing that the late earthquakes, and our being at war with a powerful nation, are loud calls from divine providence for a speedy and a thorow reformation, and for favouring the corrector's honest designs for that purpose. With an account of his earnest application to Parliament for an act to enable him to carry his good designs into execution. As also, an account of his visiting, as corrector of the people, last summer, the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, Eton-College, Windsor, and Tunbridge, and lately Westminster-School. Interspersed with many religious admonitions and reflexions, shewing the necessity and importance of appointing a corrector of the people, or of taking some effectual measures for a speedy and a thorow reformation.
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