ID 3079
Last Name Defoe
First Name Daniel
Title
Gender Male
Date of Birth 1660
Date of Death 1731-04-24
Place of Birth London
Place of Death London
VIAF URI http://viaf.org/viaf/39375774
Wikipedia Entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Defoe
Image URL https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a3/Daniel_Defoe_Kneller_Style.jpg
Notes
Timeline

Titles

Displaying 1–25 of 30

Role Title Date
Author A Secret History of One Year 1714
Author A hymn to the mob. 1715
Author A curious little oration, deliver'd by Father Andrew, concerning the present great quarrels that divide the clergy of France. Translated from the fourth edition of the French, by Dan. De F-e. 1717
Author The question fairly stated, whether now is not the time to do justice to the friends of the government, as well as to its enemies? And whether the old excuse of its, not being a proper season, will serve any longer. 1717
Author The life, adventures, and pyracies, of the famous Captain Singleton: Containing an Account of his being set on Shore in the Island of Madagascar, his Settlement there, with a Description of the Place and Inhabitants: Of his Passage from thence, in a Paraguay, to the main Land of Africa, with an Account of the Customs and Manners of the People: His great Deliverances from the barbarous Natives and wild Beasts: Of his meeting with an Englishman, a Citizen of London, among the Indians, the great Riches he acquired, and his Voyage Home to England: As also Captain Singleton's Return to Sea, with an Account of his many Adventures and Pyracies with the famous Captain Avery and others. 1720
Author A journal of the plague year: being observations or memorials, of the most remarkable occurrences, as well publick as private, which happened in London during the last great visitation in 1665. Written by a citizen who continued all the while in London. Never made publick before 1722
Author The history and remarkable life of the truly honourable Col. Jacque, commonly call'd Col. Jack, who was born a gentleman, put 'prentice to a pick-pocket, was six and twenty years a thief, and then kidnapp'd to Virginia. Came back a merchant, married four wives, and five of them prov'd whores; went into the wars, behav'd bravely, got preferment, was made colonel of a regiment, came over, and fled with the Chevalier, and is now abroad compleating a life of wonders, and resolves to dye a general. 1723
Author The history and remarkable life of the truly honourable Col. Jacque, commonly call'd Col. Jack, who was born a gentleman, put 'prentice to a pick-pocket, was six and twenty years a thief, and then kidnapp'd to Virginia. Came back a Merchant; was Five times married to Four Whores; went into the Wars, behav'd bravely, got Preferment, was made Colonel of a Regiment, came over, and fled with the Chevalier, is still abroad compleating a Life of Wonders, and resolves to dye a General. The Second Edition. 1723
Author Every-Body's business, is no-body's business; or, private abuses, publick grievances: exemplified in the pride, insolence, and exorbitant wages of our women-servants, footmen, &c. With a proposal for amendment of the same; as also for clearing the Streets of those Vermin call'd Shoe-Cleaners, and substituting in their stead many Thousands of Industrious Poor, now ready to starve. With divers other Hints, of great Use to the Publick. Humbly submitted to the Consideration of our Legislature, and the careful perusal of all Masters and Mistresses of Families. By Andrew Moreton, Esq; 1725
Author Every-body's business, is no-body's business; or, private abuses, publick grievances: exemplified in the pride, insolence, and exorbitant wages of our women-servants, footmen, &c. With a proposal for amendment of the same; as also for clearing the Streets of those Vermin call'd Shoe-Cleaners, and substituting in their stead many Thousands of Industrious Poor, now ready to starve. With divers other Hints, of great Use to the Publick. Humbly submitted to the Consideration of our Legislature, and the careful perusal of all Masters and Mistresses of Families. By Andrew Moreton, Esq; The Fifth Edition, with the Addition of a Preface. 1725
Author Every-Body's business, is no-body's business; or, private abuses, publick grievances: exemplified in the pride, insolence, and exorbitant wages of our women-servants, footmen, &c. With a proposal for amendment of the same; as also for clearing the Streets of those Vermin call'd Shoe-Cleaners, and substituting in their stead many Thousands of Industrious Poor, now ready to starve. With divers other Hints, of great Use to the Publick. Humbly submitted to the Consideration of our Legislature, and the careful perusal of all Masters and Mistresses of Families. By Andrew Moreton, Esq; The Fourth Edition, corrected. 1725
Author Every-Body's business, is No-Body's Business; or, private abuses, publick grievances: exemplified in the pride, Insolence, and exorbitant wages of our women-servants, footmen, &c. With a proposal for amendment of the same; as also for clearing the Streets of those Vermin call'd Shoe-Cleaners, and substituting in their stead many Thousands of Industrious Poor, now ready to starve. With divers other Hints, of great Use to the Publick. Humbly submitted to the Consideration of our Legislature, and the careful perusal of all Masters and Mistresses of Families. By Andrew Moreton, Esq; The Second Edition 1725
Author Every-Body's business, is no-body's business; or, private abuses, publick grievances: exemplified in the pride, insolence, and exorbitant wages of our women-servants, footmen, &c. With a proposal for amendment of the same; as also for clearing the Streets of those Vermin call'd Shoe-Cleaners, and substituting in their stead many Thousands of Industrious Poor, now ready to starve. With divers other Hints, of great Use to the Publick. Humbly submitted to the Consideration of our Legislature, and the careful perusal of all Masters and Mistresses of Families. By Andrew Moreton, Esq; The Third Edition. 1725
Author A brief deduction of the original, progress, and immense greatness of the British Woollen Manufacture: with an enquiry whether it be not at present in a very declining condition: The Reasons of its Decay; and the Only Means of its Recovery. 1727
Author The evident advantages to Great Britain and its allies from the approaching war: Especially in Matters of Trade. To which is Added Two Curious Plans, One of the Port and Bay of Havana; the other of Porto-Belo. 1727
Author The evident approach of a war; and something of the necessity of it, in order to establish peace and preserve trade. Pax Quaeritur Bello. To which is added, an exact plan and description of the bay and city of Gibraltar. The Second Edition. 1727
Author The evident approach of a war; and something of the necessity of it, in order to establish peace, and preserve trade. To which is added, an exact plan and description of the bay and city of Gibraltar. 1727
Author The protestant monastery: or, a complaint against the brutality of the present age. Particularly the pertness and insolence of our youth to aged persons. With a Caution to People in Years, how they give the Staff out of their own Hands, and leave themselves at the Mercy of others. Concluding with a proposal for erecting a Protestant monastery, where persons of small fortunes may end their day in plenty, ease, and credit, without burthening their Relations, or accepting Publick Charities. By Andrew Moreton, Esq; Author of Every-Body's Business is No-Body's Business. 1727
Author Augusta triumphans: or, the way to make London the most flourishing city in the universe. First, by establishing an university where Gentlemen may have Academical Education under the Eye of their Friends. II. To prevent much Murder, &c. by an Hospital for Foundlings. III. By suppressing pretended Mad-Houses, where many of the fair Sex are unjustly confin'd, while their Husbands keep Mistresses, &c. and many Widows are lock'd up for the Sake of their Jointure. IV. To save our Youth from Destruction, by clearing the Streets of impudent Strumpets, Suppressing Gaming-Tables, and Sunday Debauches. V. To avoid the expensive Importation of Foreign Musicians, by forming an Academy of our own. VI. To save our lower Class of People from utter Ruin, and render them useful, by preventing the immoderate Use of Geneva: With a frank Explosion of many other common Abuses, and incontestable Rules for Amendment. Concluding with an effectual method to prevent street robberies; and a letter to Coll. Robinson, on account of the orphan's tax. 1728
Author A compleat system of magick: or, The history of the black-art. Shewing, I. The original of magicians; and how some of them were made kings, as Zoroafter, Cadmus, and many others. II. How the ancient magi, who study'd philosophy, astronomy, &c. were induc'd to turn wizards and sorcers, and deal with the devil; and how their conversation began. III. The different shapes assum'd by the devil in his first appearances to magicians; and whether he is, or has been, allow'd to assume a human-shape. IV. Who first practised magick as a diabolical art, and its progress among the Egyptians and Phoenicians; by whom it was first openly encourag'd, and of its present state. V. What the black-art, really is, the various manner of its practice in different parts of the world, and of the doctrine of spirits. VI. How far it may be suppos'd there can be an intercourse between superiour and insernal beings, and whether the magick-art now subsists. VII. How far the devil may be raised by magical operations; and whether it is by their own power, or by mutual concert with the devil. The whole compiled from the best authorities ancient and modern 1729
Author Augusta triumphans: or, the way to make London the most flourishing city in the universe. First, by establishing an university where Gentlemen may have Academical Education under the Eye of their Friends. II. By an Hospital for Foundlings. III. By forming an Academy of Sciences at Christ's-Hospital. IV. By suppressing pretended Mad-Houses, where many of the fair Sex are unjustly confin'd, while their Husbands keep Mistresses, &c. and many Widows are lock'd up for the Sake of their Jointure. V. To save our Youth from Destruction, by clearing the Streets of impudent Strumpets. Suppressing Gaming - Tables, and Sunday Debauches. VI. To save our lower Class of People from utter Ruin, and render them useful by preventing the immoderate Use of Geneva: With a frank Explosion of many other common Abuses, and incontestable Rules for Amendment. Concluding with an effectual method to prevent street robberies; and a letter to Coll. Robinson, on account of the orphan's tax. By Andrew Moreton, Esq; The Second Edition. 1729
Author Some objections humbly offered to the consideration of the Hon. House of Commons, relating to the present intended relief of prisoners. 1729
Author The advantages of peace and commerce; with some remarks on the East-India trade. 1729
Author The generous projector, or a friendly proposal to prevent murder and other enormous abuses, by erecting an hospital for foundlings and bastard-children. With a full answer to all objections yet brought against that laudable undertaking. Also to save many persons from destruction, by clearing the streets of shameless strumpets, suppressing gaming-tables and Sunday debauches: with a plain explosion of, and proposal to amend a growing abuse, viz. the barbarous custom of men's putting their wives into private mad-houses, on frivolous pretences, where they often end their days in the utmost misery: also a proposal to amend several great abuses daily committed by watermen. and necessary hints for redressing divers other publick grievances, which call aloud for amendment. Humbly dedicated to the right honourable Humphry Parsons, Esq; Lord-Mayor of the city of London. And highly worthy the consideration of the Legislature. 1731
Author The true-Born Englishman. A satire. Corrected and enlarg'd by the author. 1748

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"Defoe, Daniel" The Women's Print History Project, 2019, Person ID 3079, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/person/3079. Accessed 2024-04-16.

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