ID 4005
Last Name Dodd II
First Name Anne
Title
Gender Female
Date of Birth
Date of Death 1757
Place of Birth
Place of Death London
Related Firms Anne Dodd II
Anne Dodd I
VIAF URI http://viaf.org/viaf/11160664937303360561/#Dodd,_Anne,_active_1739-1757
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Titles

Displaying 26–50 of 223

Role Title Date
Bookseller The inspiration of the New Testament asserted: the integrity of the sacred writers vindicated; and the method of salvation by a redeemer confirmed. In answer to a late book of Mr. Chubb's, entitled, The true gospel of Jesus Christ asserted. Humbly offered to Publick Consideration, And in particular to all those who esteem themselves, or are esteemed by others to be Holders forth of New-Light, and Great Proficients in Moral Argument. In a letter to that author. By Phileleutherus Christianus. 1739
Bookseller The Irresistible Fair, a Poem. Humbly Inscrib'd to that Incomparable, and Celebrated Beauty, Miss F--y Be--l. By J. Dodd, Philomathes. 1739
Publisher The london-Citizen exceedingly injured: or a British inquisition display'd, in an account of the unparallel'd case of a citizen of London, bookseller to the late Queen, who was in a most unjust and arbitrary Manner sent on the 23d of March 1737/8, by one Robert Wightman of Edinburgh, a mere Stranger, to a private madhouse. Containing, I. An Account of the said Citizen's barbarous Treatment in Wright's Private Madhouse on Bethnal-Green for nine Weeks and six Days, and of his rational and patient Behaviour, whilst Chained, Handcuffed, Strait-Wastecoated and Imprisoned in the said Madhouse: Where he probably would have been continued, or died under his Confinement, if he had not most Providentially made his Escape: In which he was taken up by the Constable and Watchmen, being suspected to be a Felon, but was unchain'd and set at liberty by Sir John Barnard the then Lord Mayor. II. As also an Account of the illegal Steps, false Calumnies, wicked Contrivances, bold and desperate Designs of the said Wightman, in order to escape Justice for his Crimes, with some Account of his engaging Dr. Monro the Chairman, and Dr. Guyse, Mr. Crooksbank, J. Oswald, J. Coake, and R. Horton to be Judges of his Blind-Bench, and others as his Accomplices. The whole humbly addressed to the legislature, as plainly shewing the absolute Necessity of regulating Private Madhouses in a more effectual manner than at present. 1739
Publisher The london-Citizen exceedingly injured: or a British inquisition display'd, in an account of the unparallel'd case of a citizen of London, bookseller to the late Queen, who was in a most unjust and arbitrary Manner sent on the 23d of March last, 1738, by one Robert Wightman, a mere Stranger, to a private madhouse Containing, I. An Account of the said Citizen's barbarous Treatment in Wright's Private Madhouse on Bethnal-Green for nine Weeks and six Days, and of his rational and patient Behaviour, whilst Chained, Handcuffed, Strait-Wastecoated and Imprisoned in the said Madhouse: Where he probably would have been continued, or died under his Confinement, if he had not most Providentially made his Escape: In which he was taken up by the Constable and Watchmen, being suspected to be a Felon, but was unchain'd and set at liberty by Sir John Barnard the then Lord Mayor. II. As also an Account of the illegal Steps, false Calumnies, wicked Contrivances, bold and desperate Designs of the said Wightman, in order to escape Justice for his Crimes, with some Account of his engaging Dr. Monro and others as his Accomplices. The Whole humbly addressed to the Legislature, as plainly shewing the absolute Necessity of regulating Private Madhouses in a more effectual manner than at present. 1739
Bookseller The philosopher's stone; or grand elixir, discover'd by Friar Bacon; and now publish'd as a counterpart to the degradation of gold by an anti-elixir. With a few notes, by no adept. 1739
Publisher The present state of politicks in Europe. With some observations on the present posture of our own affairs. 1739
Printer The tragedy of King Saul. Written by the author of Abra-mule: or, love and empire. The Second Edition. 1739
Bookseller The tragedy of King Saul. Written by the author of Abra-mule: or, love and empire. The Second Edition. 1739
Bookseller True Character of the Rev. Mr. Whitefield; In a Letter from a Deist in London, to his Friend in the Country. With some Observations on the Dispute between Dr. Trapp and Mr. Whitefield, and the Behaviour of the Clergy. Likewise the sentiments, manners, &c. of deists, fairly stated by real truths. 1739
Bookseller Truth. A counterpart to Mr. Pope’s Essay on man. Epistle the second, Opposing his opinions of Man as an Individual. By Mr. Ayre 1739
Bookseller A Collection of papers, lately printed in the daily advertiser. Containing, I. A letter from the Rev. Mr. Whitefield to a friend in London, dated at New-Brunswick in New-Jersey, April 27, 1740. II. A letter from the Rev. Mr. Whitefield, to the inhabitants of Maryland, Virginia, North and South-Carolina. III. A letter from the Rev. Mr. Whitefield to a friend in London; shewing the fundamental error of a book called The Whole Duty of Man. IV. A letter from the Rev. Mr. Whitefield, at Georgia, to a friend in London, wherein he vindicates his asserting, that Archbishop Tillotson knew no more of true Christianity than Mahomet. V. A second letter on the same subject. VI. Some observations on the Rev. Mr. Whitefield and his opposers. VII. The manner of the childrens spending their time at the Orphan-House in Georgia. 1740
Publisher A draught of the justification of man, different from the present language of our pulpits. By Robert Seagrave ... 1740
Bookseller A poem on the death of the Honourable the Lady Elizabeth Hastings. 1740
Bookseller An Impartial Enquiry into the Moral Character of Jesus Christ: Wherein he is Considered as a Philosopher. In a Letter to a Friend. 1740
Bookseller Journal of a voyage from Savannah to Philadelphia, and from Philadelphia to England, M, DCC.XL. By William Seward, Gent. Companion in Travel with the Reverend Mr. George Whitefield. 1740
Publisher Paradise Lost: A Poem. Attempted in Rhime. Book I 1740
Bookseller Paradise lost: a poem. Attempted in rhime. Book I. 1740
Bookseller Reasons for an immediate war against France. 1740
Publisher The History of Thamas Kuli Khan, Shah, or Sophi of Persia. Extracted from the French. 1740
Publisher The Importance of Jamaica to Great-Britain, consider'd. With some account of that island, from its discovery in 1492 to this time: and a list of the governors and presidents, with an account of their towns, harbours, bays, buildings, inhabitants, whites and negroes, &c. The country and people cleared from misrepresentations; the misbehaviour of Spanish governors by entertaining pirates, and plundering the inhabitants and merchants of Jamaica, and the rise of the pirates among them. An account of their fruits, drugs, timber and dying-woods, and of the uses they are apply'd to there: with a description of exotick plants, preserved in the gardens of the curious in England; and of the kitchen and flower-gardens in the West-Indies. Also of their beasts, birds, fishes, and insects; with their eatables and potables, distempers and remedies. With an account of their trade and produce; with the advantages they are of to Great-Britain, Ireland, and the colonies in North-America, and the commodities they take in return from them, with the danger they are in from the French at Hispaniola, and their other islands and settlements on the continent, by the encouragements they have over the British planters. With instances of insults they have given His Majesty's subjects in the West-Indies and on the main. With the representation of His Late Majesty when elector of Hanover, and of the House of Lords, against a peace, which could not be safe or honourable if Spain or the West-Indies were allotted to any branch of the House of Bourbon. In a letter to a gentleman. In which is added, a postscript, of the benefits which may arise by keeping of Carthagena, to Great-Britain and our American colonies; with an account of what goods are used in the Spanish trade, and hints of settling it after the French method (by sending of women there) and of the trade and method of living of the Spaniards; and English South-Sea Company's factors there. 1740?
Publisher The nature of true patriotism delineated, in a sermon, preached, February 4, 1740. Being the day appointed for publick humiliation, fasting and prayer. By a country curate. 1740?
Bookseller The trial of Mrs. Branch, and her daughter, for the murder of Jane Buttersworth, before the Hon. Mr. Justice Chapple, at Somerset assizes, March 31, 1740. With a Preface, Containing an exact Account, taken from the Persons who saw the Lights in Hemington Church-Yard, the Night before the Corpse was taken up, and the true Motives for taking up the Corpse. To which are added, true copies of some very material informations, taken before Joseph Houlton, and Robert Smith, Esqrs. Justices of the Peace. With a just account of the prisoners behaviour at their trial; at, and after Sentence; and at the Place of Execution. and at the place of execution. The Second Edition. 1740?
Bookseller The trial of Mrs. Branch, and her daughter, for the murder of Jane Buttersworth, before the Hon. Mr. Justice Chapple, at Somerset assizes, March 31, 1740. With a preface, containing an exact acount, taken from the persons who saw the lights in Hemington church-yard, the night before the corpse was taken up, and the true motives for taking up the corpse. To which are added, true copies of some very material informations, taken before Joseph Houlton, and Robert Smith, Esqrs. Justices of the Peace. With a just account of the prisoners behaviour at their trial; at, and after sentence; and at the place of execution. 1740?
Bookseller A present for an apprentice: Or, A sure guide to gain both esteem and estate. With rules for his conduct to his master, and in the world. Under the following heads, lying, dishonesty, fidelity, temperance, excess of all kinds, government of the tongue, other peoples quarrels, quarrels of one's own, affability, frugality, industry, value of time, company, friendship, bonds and securities, recreations, gaming, company of women, horse-keeping, proper persons to deal with, suspicion, resentment, complacency, tempers and faces of men, irresolution and indolence, caution in setting-up great rents fine shops, servants, choice of a wife, happiness after marriage, domestick quarrels, house-keeping, education of children, politicks, religion. By a late Lord Mayor of London. 1741
Bookseller A Serious address to the electors of Great Britain. In which the conduct and designs both of the court and country parties are impartially represented and considered: and such gentlemen pointed out, as are most deserving of the favour of the electors, in the approaching choice of their representatives. 1741

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"Dodd II, Anne" The Women's Print History Project, 2019, Person ID 4005, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/person/4005. Accessed 2024-02-27.

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