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Unknown. The Importance of Jamaica to Great-Britain, consider'd. With some account of that island, from its discovery in 1492 to this time: and a list of the governors and presidents, with an account of their towns, harbours, bays, buildings, inhabitants, whites and negroes, &c. The country and people cleared from misrepresentations; the misbehaviour of Spanish governors by entertaining pirates, and plundering the inhabitants and merchants of Jamaica, and the rise of the pirates among them. An account of their fruits, drugs, timber and dying-woods, and of the uses they are apply'd to there: with a description of exotick plants, preserved in the gardens of the curious in England; and of the kitchen and flower-gardens in the West-Indies. Also of their beasts, birds, fishes, and insects; with their eatables and potables, distempers and remedies. With an account of their trade and produce; with the advantages they are of to Great-Britain, Ireland, and the colonies in North-America, and the commodities they take in return from them, with the danger they are in from the French at Hispaniola, and their other islands and settlements on the continent, by the encouragements they have over the British planters. With instances of insults they have given His Majesty's subjects in the West-Indies and on the main. With the representation of His Late Majesty when elector of Hanover, and of the House of Lords, against a peace, which could not be safe or honourable if Spain or the West-Indies were allotted to any branch of the House of Bourbon. In a letter to a gentleman. In which is added, a postscript, of the benefits which may arise by keeping of Carthagena, to Great-Britain and our American colonies; with an account of what goods are used in the Spanish trade, and hints of settling it after the French method (by sending of women there) and of the trade and method of living of the Spaniards; and English South-Sea Company's factors there.The Women's Print History Project, 2019, title ID 25730, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/title/25730. Accessed 2024-04-12.

Unknown, . The Importance of Jamaica to Great-Britain, consider'd. With some account of that island, from its discovery in 1492 to this time: and a list of the governors and presidents, with an account of their towns, harbours, bays, buildings, inhabitants, whites and negroes, &c. The country and people cleared from misrepresentations; the misbehaviour of Spanish governors by entertaining pirates, and plundering the inhabitants and merchants of Jamaica, and the rise of the pirates among them. An account of their fruits, drugs, timber and dying-woods, and of the uses they are apply'd to there: with a description of exotick plants, preserved in the gardens of the curious in England; and of the kitchen and flower-gardens in the West-Indies. Also of their beasts, birds, fishes, and insects; with their eatables and potables, distempers and remedies. With an account of their trade and produce; with the advantages they are of to Great-Britain, Ireland, and the colonies in North-America, and the commodities they take in return from them, with the danger they are in from the French at Hispaniola, and their other islands and settlements on the continent, by the encouragements they have over the British planters. With instances of insults they have given His Majesty's subjects in the West-Indies and on the main. With the representation of His Late Majesty when elector of Hanover, and of the House of Lords, against a peace, which could not be safe or honourable if Spain or the West-Indies were allotted to any branch of the House of Bourbon. In a letter to a gentleman. In which is added, a postscript, of the benefits which may arise by keeping of Carthagena, to Great-Britain and our American colonies; with an account of what goods are used in the Spanish trade, and hints of settling it after the French method (by sending of women there) and of the trade and method of living of the Spaniards; and English South-Sea Company's factors there. London: Anne Dodd II, 1740?.

Unknown , . (1740?). The importance of jamaica to great-britain, consider'd. with some account of that island, from its discovery in 1492 to this time: and a list of the governors and presidents, with an account of their towns, harbours, bays, buildings, inhabitants, whites and negroes, &c. the country and people cleared from misrepresentations; the misbehaviour of spanish governors by entertaining pirates, and plundering the inhabitants and merchants of jamaica, and the rise of the pirates among them. an account of their fruits, drugs, timber and dying-woods, and of the uses they are apply'd to there: with a description of exotick plants, preserved in the gardens of the curious in england; and of the kitchen and flower-gardens in the west-indies. also of their beasts, birds, fishes, and insects; with their eatables and potables, distempers and remedies. with an account of their trade and produce; with the advantages they are of to great-britain, ireland, and the colonies in north-america, and the commodities they take in return from them, with the danger they are in from the french at hispaniola, and their other islands and settlements on the continent, by the encouragements they have over the british planters. with instances of insults they have given his majesty's subjects in the west-indies and on the main. with the representation of his late majesty when elector of hanover, and of the house of lords, against a peace, which could not be safe or honourable if spain or the west-indies were allotted to any branch of the house of bourbon. in a letter to a gentleman. in which is added, a postscript, of the benefits which may arise by keeping of carthagena, to great-britain and our american colonies; with an account of what goods are used in the spanish trade, and hints of settling it after the french method (by sending of women there) and of the trade and method of living of the spaniards; and english south-sea company's factors there. London: Anne Dodd II.

Unknown, . The Importance of Jamaica to Great-Britain, consider'd. With some account of that island, from its discovery in 1492 to this time: and a list of the governors and presidents, with an account of their towns, harbours, bays, buildings, inhabitants, whites and negroes, &c. The country and people cleared from misrepresentations; the misbehaviour of Spanish governors by entertaining pirates, and plundering the inhabitants and merchants of Jamaica, and the rise of the pirates among them. An account of their fruits, drugs, timber and dying-woods, and of the uses they are apply'd to there: with a description of exotick plants, preserved in the gardens of the curious in England; and of the kitchen and flower-gardens in the West-Indies. Also of their beasts, birds, fishes, and insects; with their eatables and potables, distempers and remedies. With an account of their trade and produce; with the advantages they are of to Great-Britain, Ireland, and the colonies in North-America, and the commodities they take in return from them, with the danger they are in from the French at Hispaniola, and their other islands and settlements on the continent, by the encouragements they have over the British planters. With instances of insults they have given His Majesty's subjects in the West-Indies and on the main. With the representation of His Late Majesty when elector of Hanover, and of the House of Lords, against a peace, which could not be safe or honourable if Spain or the West-Indies were allotted to any branch of the House of Bourbon. In a letter to a gentleman. In which is added, a postscript, of the benefits which may arise by keeping of Carthagena, to Great-Britain and our American colonies; with an account of what goods are used in the Spanish trade, and hints of settling it after the French method (by sending of women there) and of the trade and method of living of the Spaniards; and English South-Sea Company's factors there. London: Anne Dodd II, 1740?.

@book{ wphp_25730
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1740?},
  title={The Importance of Jamaica to Great-Britain, consider'd. With some account of that island, from its discovery in 1492 to this time: and a list of the governors and presidents, with an account of their towns, harbours, bays, buildings, inhabitants, whites and negroes, &c. The country and people cleared from misrepresentations; the misbehaviour of Spanish governors by entertaining pirates, and plundering the inhabitants and merchants of Jamaica, and the rise of the pirates among them. An account of their fruits, drugs, timber and dying-woods, and of the uses they are apply'd to there: with a description of exotick plants, preserved in the gardens of the curious in England; and of the kitchen and flower-gardens in the West-Indies. Also of their beasts, birds, fishes, and insects; with their eatables and potables, distempers and remedies. With an account of their trade and produce; with the advantages they are of to Great-Britain, Ireland, and the colonies in North-America, and the commodities they take in return from them, with the danger they are in from the French at Hispaniola, and their other islands and settlements on the continent, by the encouragements they have over the British planters. With instances of insults they have given His Majesty's subjects in the West-Indies and on the main. With the representation of His Late Majesty when elector of Hanover, and of the House of Lords, against a peace, which could not be safe or honourable if Spain or the West-Indies were allotted to any branch of the House of Bourbon. In a letter to a gentleman. In which is added, a postscript, of the benefits which may arise by keeping of Carthagena, to Great-Britain and our American colonies; with an account of what goods are used in the Spanish trade, and hints of settling it after the French method (by sending of women there) and of the trade and method of living of the Spaniards; and English South-Sea Company's factors there.},
  publisher={Anne Dodd II},
  address={London},    }

Suggestions and Comments for The Importance of Jamaica to Great-Britain, consider'd. With some account of that island, from its discovery in 1492 to this time: and a list of the governors and presidents, with an account of their towns, harbours, bays, buildings, inhabitants, whites and negroes, &c. The country and people cleared from misrepresentations; the misbehaviour of Spanish governors by entertaining pirates, and plundering the inhabitants and merchants of Jamaica, and the rise of the pirates among them. An account of their fruits, drugs, timber and dying-woods, and of the uses they are apply'd to there: with a description of exotick plants, preserved in the gardens of the curious in England; and of the kitchen and flower-gardens in the West-Indies. Also of their beasts, birds, fishes, and insects; with their eatables and potables, distempers and remedies. With an account of their trade and produce; with the advantages they are of to Great-Britain, Ireland, and the colonies in North-America, and the commodities they take in return from them, with the danger they are in from the French at Hispaniola, and their other islands and settlements on the continent, by the encouragements they have over the British planters. With instances of insults they have given His Majesty's subjects in the West-Indies and on the main. With the representation of His Late Majesty when elector of Hanover, and of the House of Lords, against a peace, which could not be safe or honourable if Spain or the West-Indies were allotted to any branch of the House of Bourbon. In a letter to a gentleman. In which is added, a postscript, of the benefits which may arise by keeping of Carthagena, to Great-Britain and our American colonies; with an account of what goods are used in the Spanish trade, and hints of settling it after the French method (by sending of women there) and of the trade and method of living of the Spaniards; and English South-Sea Company's factors there.
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