Name Economics/Finance
Description

Titles

Displaying 1–10 of 10

ID Title Author Firms (City) Date Edition
25631 A brief deduction of the original, progress, and immense greatness of the British Woollen Manufacture: with an enquiry whether it be not at present in a very declining condition: The Reasons of its Decay; and the Only Means of its Recovery. Defoe , Daniel
1727
825 Essay on the Proper Employment of Time, Talents, Fortune, &c. Bowdler , Henrietta Maria
1836
25273 Every-body's business, is no-body's business; or, private abuses, publick grievances: exemplified in the pride, insolence, and exorbitant wages of our women-servants, footmen, &c. With a proposal for amendment of the same; as also for clearing the Streets of those Vermin call'd Shoe-Cleaners, and substituting in their stead many Thousands of Industrious Poor, now ready to starve. With divers other Hints, of great Use to the Publick. Humbly submitted to the Consideration of our Legislature, and the careful perusal of all Masters and Mistresses of Families. By Andrew Moreton, Esq; The Fifth Edition, with the Addition of a Preface. Defoe , Daniel
William Meadows (Cornhill)
1725 The Fifth Edition with the Addition of a Preface
25992 Peace and trade, war and taxes: or, the irreparable damage of our trade in case of a war. In a letter to the Craftsman. By Tho. Merchant, Esq; Merchant , Thomas
John Brindley (London)
Robert Walker [Temple Bar] (London)
Elizabeth Nutt [Royal Exchange] (London)
1729
25335 Reasons for a war, In Order to Establish the Tranquillity and Commerce of Europe. Unknown ,
Anne Dodd I (London)
Robert Walker [Temple Bar] (London)
Elizabeth Nutt [Royal Exchange] (London)
Elizabeth Smith (London)
1729
25360 Remarks on a pamphlet intituled Oculus Britanniæ: an heroi panegyrical poem on the University of Oxford. Occasion'd by the late publishing of a book call'd Terræ-filius. To which is added, modern poetry: a satyr. Unknown ,
1726
25334 Seasonable considerations relating to insolvent debtors, drawn from the practice of foreign states, Addressed to the Right Honourable Arthur Onslow, Esq; speaker of the Honourable House of Commons, and one of His Majesty's Most Honourable Privy-Council. Unknown ,
Henry Whitridge [Royal Exchange] (London)
Anne Dodd I (London)
1729
25393 The advantages of peace and commerce; with some remarks on the East-India trade. Defoe , Daniel
John Brotherton (Cornhill)
Thomas Cox (Cornhill)
1729
25358 The evident advantages to Great Britain and its allies from the approaching war: Especially in Matters of Trade. To which is Added Two Curious Plans, One of the Port and Bay of Havana; the other of Porto-Belo. Defoe , Daniel
1727
25730 The Importance of Jamaica to Great-Britain, consider'd. With some account of that island, from its discovery in 1492 to this time: and a list of the governors and presidents, with an account of their towns, harbours, bays, buildings, inhabitants, whites and negroes, &c. The country and people cleared from misrepresentations; the misbehaviour of Spanish governors by entertaining pirates, and plundering the inhabitants and merchants of Jamaica, and the rise of the pirates among them. An account of their fruits, drugs, timber and dying-woods, and of the uses they are apply'd to there: with a description of exotick plants, preserved in the gardens of the curious in England; and of the kitchen and flower-gardens in the West-Indies. Also of their beasts, birds, fishes, and insects; with their eatables and potables, distempers and remedies. With an account of their trade and produce; with the advantages they are of to Great-Britain, Ireland, and the colonies in North-America, and the commodities they take in return from them, with the danger they are in from the French at Hispaniola, and their other islands and settlements on the continent, by the encouragements they have over the British planters. With instances of insults they have given His Majesty's subjects in the West-Indies and on the main. With the representation of His Late Majesty when elector of Hanover, and of the House of Lords, against a peace, which could not be safe or honourable if Spain or the West-Indies were allotted to any branch of the House of Bourbon. In a letter to a gentleman. In which is added, a postscript, of the benefits which may arise by keeping of Carthagena, to Great-Britain and our American colonies; with an account of what goods are used in the Spanish trade, and hints of settling it after the French method (by sending of women there) and of the trade and method of living of the Spaniards; and English South-Sea Company's factors there. Unknown ,
Anne Dodd II (London)
1740?