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Unknown. The art of governing. Shewing, I. The several sorts of governments at this time establish'd in Europe; from which is taken the best Kind of Government for a Free People, as that of England, &c. II. Of the abuse of government, by publick ministers, in respect to liberty, &c. on the Maxim in Law, The King can do no Wrong; with the Character of a Modern Statesman, and the great Lord Bacon's Advice to a Courtier. III. Of freedom and slavery, as to Government; manifesting, that by the extraordinary Use, or the Non-Use of National Laws, and general Corruptions, they may be much the same Thing. IV. Of the Parliament of England, and the Frequency of British Parliaments; proving the latter not only the Fundamental Right of this Nation, but that Liberty is grounded upon, and cannot Subsist without it. The Second Edition.The Women's Print History Project, 2019, title ID 24988, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/title/24988. Accessed 2024-07-22.

@book{ wphp_24988
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1722},
  title={The art of governing. Shewing, I. The several sorts of governments at this time establish'd in Europe; from which is taken the best Kind of Government for a Free People, as that of England, &c. II. Of the abuse of government, by publick ministers, in respect to liberty, &c. on the Maxim in Law, The King can do no Wrong; with the Character of a Modern Statesman, and the great Lord Bacon's Advice to a Courtier. III. Of freedom and slavery, as to Government; manifesting, that by the extraordinary Use, or the Non-Use of National Laws, and general Corruptions, they may be much the same Thing. IV. Of the Parliament of England, and the Frequency of British Parliaments; proving the latter not only the Fundamental Right of this Nation, but that Liberty is grounded upon, and cannot Subsist without it. The Second Edition.},
  publisher={Thomas Warner \& Anne Dodd I},
  address={London},    }

Suggestions and Comments for The art of governing. Shewing, I. The several sorts of governments at this time establish'd in Europe; from which is taken the best Kind of Government for a Free People, as that of England, &c. II. Of the abuse of government, by publick ministers, in respect to liberty, &c. on the Maxim in Law, The King can do no Wrong; with the Character of a Modern Statesman, and the great Lord Bacon's Advice to a Courtier. III. Of freedom and slavery, as to Government; manifesting, that by the extraordinary Use, or the Non-Use of National Laws, and general Corruptions, they may be much the same Thing. IV. Of the Parliament of England, and the Frequency of British Parliaments; proving the latter not only the Fundamental Right of this Nation, but that Liberty is grounded upon, and cannot Subsist without it. The Second Edition.
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