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London, John. An answer to the pretended remarks on Mr. Webber's scheme, and the draper's pamphlet; shewing, that the remarker hath not made the least objection to the scheme, which the draper recommended, nor disprov'd the least fact which he advanc'd: as also, that all that hath been alledged by the Gentleman's Magazine against it is groundless, and that the truth of the calculation is undoubted. To which is added, a copy of the letter which Mr. Webber received, concerning its being stipulated that France should have our wool; which letter also contains a short, but pathetick address, to the electors of Great-Britain. Written at the time of the last election, and altogether as necessary at this time, with some other reasons; setting forth the probability of such a stipulation also, a petition, intended to have been presented to Parliament, praying, an act to confirm the charter which His Majesty granted Mr. Webber: which petition was not refused, on account of such a charter not having been granted, but as a private bill that came too late. By John London.The Women's Print History Project, 2019, title ID 25717, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/title/25717. Accessed 2024-04-23.

@book{ wphp_25717
  author={London,John},
  year={1741},
  title={An answer to the pretended remarks on Mr. Webber's scheme, and the draper's pamphlet; shewing, that the remarker hath not made the least objection to the scheme, which the draper recommended, nor disprov'd the least fact which he advanc'd: as also, that all that hath been alledged by the Gentleman's Magazine against it is groundless, and that the truth of the calculation is undoubted. To which is added, a copy of the letter which Mr. Webber received, concerning its being stipulated that France should have our wool; which letter also contains a short, but pathetick address, to the electors of Great-Britain. Written at the time of the last election, and altogether as necessary at this time, with some other reasons; setting forth the probability of such a stipulation also, a petition, intended to have been presented to Parliament, praying, an act to confirm the charter which His Majesty granted Mr. Webber: which petition was not refused, on account of such a charter not having been granted, but as a private bill that came too late. By John London.},
  publisher={},
  address={London},    }

Suggestions and Comments for An answer to the pretended remarks on Mr. Webber's scheme, and the draper's pamphlet; shewing, that the remarker hath not made the least objection to the scheme, which the draper recommended, nor disprov'd the least fact which he advanc'd: as also, that all that hath been alledged by the Gentleman's Magazine against it is groundless, and that the truth of the calculation is undoubted. To which is added, a copy of the letter which Mr. Webber received, concerning its being stipulated that France should have our wool; which letter also contains a short, but pathetick address, to the electors of Great-Britain. Written at the time of the last election, and altogether as necessary at this time, with some other reasons; setting forth the probability of such a stipulation also, a petition, intended to have been presented to Parliament, praying, an act to confirm the charter which His Majesty granted Mr. Webber: which petition was not refused, on account of such a charter not having been granted, but as a private bill that came too late. By John London.
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