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Unknown. The Harlot's Progress: or, the Humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to Town in the York Waggon; her being betray'd by an old Baud into the Arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early Improvement in the Sweets of Fornication; and some Dialogues, Serious and Comical, between a Country Girl in the Waggon, and a Parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry Intrigues in the Jew's House; with Satyrical Pictures in the Jew's Chamber. III. Her living in a Baudy-House in Drury-Lane; her Extravagance, Company, Baudy-House Equipage, Pictures, and other Drury Decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her Usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; with some merry Adventures of Fops, Pimps, Whores, Bauds, and Panders, who were committed to keep her Company. V. Her Sickness and Death; Disputes between two noted Quacks, Temple-Bar and Bow-Bell Doctors, on the Nature of her Distemper; and her last Will and Testament. VI. Her Burial; the Funeral Pomp of Harlots in Triumph; Six Mutes, Sisters of the Trade; the Parson, a very Wag; the Clerk, a Sly-Boots; and the Undertaker, one of the Family of the Sad Dogs. The Second Edition.The Women's Print History Project, 2019, title ID 24981, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/title/24981. Accessed 2024-03-01.

@book{ wphp_24981
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1732},
  title={The Harlot's Progress: or, the Humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to Town in the York Waggon; her being betray'd by an old Baud into the Arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early Improvement in the Sweets of Fornication; and some Dialogues, Serious and Comical, between a Country Girl in the Waggon, and a Parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry Intrigues in the Jew's House; with Satyrical Pictures in the Jew's Chamber. III. Her living in a Baudy-House in Drury-Lane; her Extravagance, Company, Baudy-House Equipage, Pictures, and other Drury Decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her Usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; with some merry Adventures of Fops, Pimps, Whores, Bauds, and Panders, who were committed to keep her Company. V. Her Sickness and Death; Disputes between two noted Quacks, Temple-Bar and Bow-Bell Doctors, on the Nature of her Distemper; and her last Will and Testament. VI. Her Burial; the Funeral Pomp of Harlots in Triumph; Six Mutes, Sisters of the Trade; the Parson, a very Wag; the Clerk, a Sly-Boots; and the Undertaker, one of the Family of the Sad Dogs. The Second Edition.},
  publisher={Bispham Dickinson \& Richard Montague \& },
  address={London},    }

Suggestions and Comments for The Harlot's Progress: or, the Humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to Town in the York Waggon; her being betray'd by an old Baud into the Arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early Improvement in the Sweets of Fornication; and some Dialogues, Serious and Comical, between a Country Girl in the Waggon, and a Parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry Intrigues in the Jew's House; with Satyrical Pictures in the Jew's Chamber. III. Her living in a Baudy-House in Drury-Lane; her Extravagance, Company, Baudy-House Equipage, Pictures, and other Drury Decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her Usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; with some merry Adventures of Fops, Pimps, Whores, Bauds, and Panders, who were committed to keep her Company. V. Her Sickness and Death; Disputes between two noted Quacks, Temple-Bar and Bow-Bell Doctors, on the Nature of her Distemper; and her last Will and Testament. VI. Her Burial; the Funeral Pomp of Harlots in Triumph; Six Mutes, Sisters of the Trade; the Parson, a very Wag; the Clerk, a Sly-Boots; and the Undertaker, one of the Family of the Sad Dogs. The Second Edition.
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