ID 6771
Name Richard Montague
Gender Male
Street Address General Post-Office in Great Queen-Street, near Drury-Lane
City London
Start Date 1722
End Date 1741
Sources ESTC (#N1707)
Notes

Titles

Displaying 1–11 of 11

Firm Role Title Contributors Date
Publisher A hymn to the chair: or, lucubrations, serious and comical, on the use of chairs, Benches, Forms, Joint-Stools, Three-Legged Stools, and Ducking-Stools. The Hint taken from the Craftsman of the 6th Instant, and improv'd for the Benefit of those who sit on Chairs of Ease, and those who sit upon Thorns and Nettles. - In a particular manner is handled with all due Reverence and Respect, The Chair of St-e. The Chair of the House of Commons. The L-d Ma-'s Chair. The tottering Charitable Corporation Chair. The Bench of Justices Chair. The East-India Chair. The South-Sea Chair. The Greenland Chair. The Mechanick Chairs. The Sedan Chair. The Easy Chair. The Maundering Chair. The Fornicating Chair. The Cambridge Chair. Several Imaginary Chairs. The Couch Chair. The Duke of Venus' Chair. Corporation Chairs. Trading Justices Chair. Dr. Busby's Chair. To which are added The Beauties and Advantages of other necessary Utensils to rest the Bum upon, and ease the Mind, the Body, and the Breeches. Unknown , (Author)
Nutt , Elizabeth (Bookseller)
Dodd I , Anne (Bookseller)
1732
Publisher The delightful adventures of Honest John Cole, that merry old soul. Who from his antipathy to every thing that is white, became president of the Japanner's Company, and afterwards Chairman to the Chimney-Sweepers Society; and at length instituted Patron of the merry Blacks of Waltham. His Intrigues with several Black-ey'd Girls at Black-Mary's hole, and Marriage to a Blackmore at Black-wall, and becoming a Blackwell-Hall Factor. With several Cole-Black-Jokes, Brown-Jokes, and Jokes as sweet as Honey. Together with diverting Songs, his Death and Burial, which was on Black-Heath, under a Black-Thorn; and his Epitaph, wrote by a Colamantee Negro from Antegoa, nam'd Diego in the Creolian Stile and Language ... By a tipling philosopher of the Royal Society. Nutt , Elizabeth (Bookseller)
Dodd I , Anne (Bookseller)
Unknown , [Man] (Author)
1732
Publisher The harlot's progress: or, the humours of Drury-Lane. Being the life of the noted Moll Hackabout, in six hudibrastick cantos, with a curious print to each canto, engrav'd from the originals of Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to Town in the York Waggon; and being betray'd by an old Baud into the Arms of Colonel Ch-s; with several Comical Dialogues, &c. II. Her being kept by a Jew; with her Intrigues in his House. III. Her living in a Baudy-House in Drury-Lane. A diverting List of the Decorations of her Lodging. Her being detected by Sir Jn G---n, &c. IV. Her Usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; and the Humours of the Place. V. Her Sickness and Death. Disputes between two noted Quacks. Her last Will. VI. Her Burial. Characters of the principal Persons who constituted the Funeral Pomp, &c. The Fifth Edition. To which is now first added, a curious Riddle, which Moll learned of the Jew, while in his keeping, and which the learned Col. Ch-s could never answer to her full Satisfaction. Unknown , (Author)
Nutt , Elizabeth (Bookseller)
Dodd I , Anne (Bookseller)
1732
Publisher The harlot's progress: or, the humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth . I. Her coming to Town in the York Waggon; her being betray'd by an old Baud into the Arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early Improvement in the Sweets of Fornication; and some Dialogues, Serious and Comical, between a Country Girl in the Waggon, and a Parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry Intrigues in the Jew's House; with Satyric̀al Pictures in the Jew's Chamber. III. Her living in a Baudy-House in Drury-Lane; her Extravagance, Company, Baudy-House Equipage, Pictures, and other Drury Decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her Usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; with some merry Adventures of Fops, Pimps, Whores, Bauds, and Panders, who were committed to keep her Company. V. Her Sickness and Death; Disputes between two noted Quacks, Temple-Bar and Bow-Bell Doctors, on the Nature of her Distemper; and her last Will and Testament. VI. Her Burial; the Funeral Pomp of Harlots in Triumph; Six Mutes, Sisters of the Trade; the Parson, a very Wag; the Clerk, a Sly-Boots; and the Undertaker, one of the Family of the Sad Dogs. The Third Edition. Unknown , (Author)
Dodd I , Anne (Bookseller)
1732
Publisher The harlot's progress: or, The humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in Hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to town in the York waggon; her being betray'd by an old baud into the arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early improvement in the sweets of fornication; and some dialogues, serious and comical, between a country girl in the waggon, and a parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry intrigues in the Jew's house; with satyrical pictures in the Jew's chamber. III. Her living in a baudy-house in Drury-Lane; her extravagance, company, baudy house equipage, pictures, and other Drury decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; ... V. Her sickness and death; ... VI. Her burial; the funeral pomp of harlots in triumph; six mutes, sisters of the trade; the parson, a very wag; the clerk, a sly-boots; and the undertaker, one of the family of the sad dogs. Unknown , (Author)
Dodd I , Anne (Bookseller)
1732
Publisher The Harlot's Progress: or, the Humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to Town in the York Waggon; her being betray'd by an old Baud into the Arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early Improvement in the Sweets of Fornication; and some Dialogues, Serious and Comical, between a Country Girl in the Waggon, and a Parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry Intrigues in the Jew's House; with Satyrical Pictures in the Jew's Chamber. III. Her living in a Baudy-House in Drury-Lane; her Extravagance, Company, Baudy-House Equipage, Pictures, and other Drury Decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her Usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; with some merry Adventures of Fops, Pimps, Whores, Bauds, and Panders, who were committed to keep her Company. V. Her Sickness and Death; Disputes between two noted Quacks, Temple-Bar and Bow-Bell Doctors, on the Nature of her Distemper; and her last Will and Testament. VI. Her Burial; the Funeral Pomp of Harlots in Triumph; Six Mutes, Sisters of the Trade; the Parson, a very Wag; the Clerk, a Sly-Boots; and the Undertaker, one of the Family of the Sad Dogs. The Second Edition. Unknown , (Author)
Dodd I , Anne (Bookseller)
1732
Publisher The progress of a rake: or, the Templar's exit. In ten cantos, in hudibrastick verse. Containing I. His coming out of the West of England, being put under the Care of his Uncle, a Middlesex Justice. II. His Learning at Westminster-School; and his creeping to Bed with the Maid, for fear of the Spirits. III. His going to Brasen-Nose College at Oxford; being expell'd for his Debaucheries; and Return into the Country; with his Whoring, Roaring, Ranting, Swearing, Fighting, &c. IV. His coming again to London; falling among Pettifoggers, and Solicitors; and the Disputes among his Friends, whether he should be a Priest, a Lawyer, or a Physician. V. His following all three successively; and his vast Improvement in each Faculty, especially that of a Cushion-Thumper. VI. His Natural Philosophy; other natural Parts, and natural Impudence. Vii. His Conversation with old Bauds, young Whores, and Town Sharpers. Viii. His ruining his Reputation, Estate, and Constitution. IX. His Pains, and Repentance; Sickness without Pity; and Misery without Mercy. X. His Death by a Halter; Burial by a Dunghil; and Funeral-Sermon by a converted Rake of Covent-Garden. The whole interspers'd with innocent Mirth, good Morals, and too much of the Author's own Experience. By the author of The harlot's progress. Unknown , (Author)
Dodd I , Anne (Bookseller)
Nutt , Elizabeth (Bookseller)
1732
Publisher Mrs. Mary Eales's Receipts. Confectioner to her late majesty Queen Anne. Eales , Mary (Author)
1733
Publisher The compleat confectioner: or, the art of candying and preserving in its utmost perfection. Being a collection of all the receipts of the late ingenious Mrs. Eales, confectioner to their late Majesties King William and Queen Anne. Eales , Mary (Author)
1733
Publisher Histories, or tales of passed times. With morals. Written in French by M. Perrault, and Englished by R. S. gent. The third edition, corrected. With cuts to every tale. Perrault , Charles (Author)
Gent , R.S. (Translator)
1741
Publisher The compleat confectioner; or, the art of candying and preserving in its utmost perfection. By the late Mrs. Eales, confectioner to King William and Queen Ann. The third edition. To which is added, a second part: containing a curious collection of receipts in cookery, pickling, family physick, &c. with the best and cheapest methods of brewing all sorts of malt liquors, and preparing sun-dry kinds of excellent made wines, not inferior to the best French; likewise many other pleasant and wholesome drinks, made from our English fruits, as cheap as common small beer. Eales , Mary (Author)
1742

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"Richard Montague" The Women's Print History Project, 2019, Firm ID 6771, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/firm/6771. Accessed 2024-07-24.

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