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Unknown. The harlot's progress: or, The humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in Hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to town in the York waggon; her being betray'd by an old baud into the arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early improvement in the sweets of fornication; and some dialogues, serious and comical, between a country girl in the waggon, and a parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry intrigues in the Jew's house; with satyrical pictures in the Jew's chamber. III. Her living in a baudy-house in Drury-Lane; her extravagance, company, baudy house equipage, pictures, and other Drury decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; ... V. Her sickness and death; ... VI. Her burial; the funeral pomp of harlots in triumph; six mutes, sisters of the trade; the parson, a very wag; the clerk, a sly-boots; and the undertaker, one of the family of the sad dogs.The Women's Print History Project, 2019, title ID 25552, https://womensprinthistoryproject.com/title/25552. Accessed 2024-06-23.

@book{ wphp_25552
  author={Unknown,},
  year={1732},
  title={The harlot's progress: or, The humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in Hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to town in the York waggon; her being betray'd by an old baud into the arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early improvement in the sweets of fornication; and some dialogues, serious and comical, between a country girl in the waggon, and a parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry intrigues in the Jew's house; with satyrical pictures in the Jew's chamber. III. Her living in a baudy-house in Drury-Lane; her extravagance, company, baudy house equipage, pictures, and other Drury decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; ... V. Her sickness and death; ... VI. Her burial; the funeral pomp of harlots in triumph; six mutes, sisters of the trade; the parson, a very wag; the clerk, a sly-boots; and the undertaker, one of the family of the sad dogs.},
  publisher={Bispham Dickinson \& Richard Montague \& },
  address={London},    }

Suggestions and Comments for The harlot's progress: or, The humours of Drury-Lane. In six cantos. Being the tale of the noted Moll Hackabout, in Hudibrastick verse, containing her whole life; which is a key to the six prints lately publish'd by Mr. Hogarth. I. Her coming to town in the York waggon; her being betray'd by an old baud into the arms of Colonel Ch-s; her early improvement in the sweets of fornication; and some dialogues, serious and comical, between a country girl in the waggon, and a parson. II. Her living with a Jew; some merry intrigues in the Jew's house; with satyrical pictures in the Jew's chamber. III. Her living in a baudy-house in Drury-Lane; her extravagance, company, baudy house equipage, pictures, and other Drury decorations; with her being detected by Sir J---n G---n. IV. Her usage at Tothil-Fields Bridewell; ... V. Her sickness and death; ... VI. Her burial; the funeral pomp of harlots in triumph; six mutes, sisters of the trade; the parson, a very wag; the clerk, a sly-boots; and the undertaker, one of the family of the sad dogs.
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